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  #31  
Old 19-02-2016, 07:18 PM
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Rubber lubrication spray (Silicone)

Very handy for getting carbs back on old inlet rubbers. (Use only a little)
Best of all use the spray on the rear wheel hub cush drive rubbers when putting them back in.
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  #32  
Old 19-02-2016, 07:21 PM
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Thats a good tip about the bolt layout when removing them from the bike and pushing them through a piece of card.
I can never find a piece of card in the garage so in the past I've used an old car wash sponge and pushed them into that.
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  #33  
Old 19-02-2016, 07:24 PM
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Buying used parts online.

Check the bike manufacturers prices for new OE parts because they are often a damned sight cheaper than used parts. Don't get ripped off, check the OE first.
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  #34  
Old 20-02-2016, 12:41 PM
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Default Really usefully boxes

Are the one's i use other boxes are available

I find boxes like these invaluable when doing job's that will take a bit of time I'm having my forks rechromed now 8 week turn around time

Instead of having all the parts on the bench for weeks I will degrease everything then put all the fork internals into one of the boxes then just put it on the shelf nice and safe, nothing can get lost or damaged while the stanchions are away

The boxes i use are stackable and strong enough to stand on also handy to sit on while working on a bike

I know some of you will be thinking that you know all these tips and hints but if they help one person out it's worth putting them up

Cheers all happy spannering Dai
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  #35  
Old 20-02-2016, 03:04 PM
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We all tend to forget things? Especially how it fits back together?
Us old cogers with decades of alcohol and motorcycle abuse aren't quite so good at remembering.

So as you take it apart, photograph it on your phone at each and every step of disassembly in a way that you know you will need when putting it all back together.
Could be a year later, or months or a day depending on the old brain cells depletion?

But it's a good system and it works!
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  #36  
Old 20-02-2016, 04:01 PM
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Default Workshop manuals

Try to get more than one for the bike your working on

I like to have a paper one plus a download one this way you can study up with the paper one then print off the relevant section from your downloaded one

The downloaded one's are often more model specific so easier to follow when in the workshop
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  #37  
Old 21-02-2016, 12:52 AM
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Default Fork caps

This one took me year's to learn, they can be awkward buggers we all know that

The way I now do them is, before I put the springs in i put the cap onto the tube and mark both with a sharpie marker just where the threads start to catch

Then when the spring is in you line up the marks press down then only turn when the faces meet a little turn back then forward they should catch easily

I found this method far easier than turning and pushing at the same time

Mark both tube and cap

Easier done than writing how to do it this one!

While on the subject of fork caps when undoing them loosen off the top yoke pinch bolt's, often it's the pressure from these that make the caps difficult to undo
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Last edited by wiskers; 21-02-2016 at 01:07 PM. Reason: Added bit about turn back then forward
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  #38  
Old 22-02-2016, 05:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HOS View Post
We all tend to forget things? Especially how it fits back together?
Us old cogers with decades of alcohol and motorcycle abuse aren't quite so good at remembering.

So as you take it apart, photograph it on your phone at each and every step of disassembly in a way that you know you will need when putting it all back together.
Could be a year later, or months or a day depending on the old brain cells depletion?

But it's a good system and it works!
If you remember to download the photos and don't delete them!
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  #39  
Old 22-02-2016, 05:09 AM
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Originally Posted by wiskers View Post
Try to get more than one for the bike your working on

I like to have a paper one plus a download one this way you can study up with the paper one then print off the relevant section from your downloaded one

The downloaded one's are often more model specific so easier to follow when in the workshop
See previous comments!
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  #40  
Old 22-02-2016, 05:12 AM
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Originally Posted by wiskers View Post
This one took me year's to learn, they can be awkward buggers we all know that

The way I now do them is, before I put the springs in i put the cap onto the tube and mark both with a sharpie marker just where the threads start to catch

Then when the spring is in you line up the marks press down then only turn when the faces meet a little turn back then forward they should catch easily

I found this method far easier than turning and pushing at the same time

Mark both tube and cap

Easier done than writing how to do it this one!

While on the subject of fork caps when undoing them loosen off the top yoke pinch bolt's, often it's the pressure from these that make the caps difficult to undo
Remember to duck as springs eject skywards like a Nasa rocket heading to the moon! oh sorry that refers to clutch springs...
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  #41  
Old 22-02-2016, 06:22 PM
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If you remember to download the photos and don't delete them!
I forgot to mention that.
So true! !!!! Damned electrickery! !! The devil's work !!
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  #42  
Old 22-02-2016, 07:29 PM
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Originally Posted by Friar Tuck View Post
Remember to duck as springs eject skywards like a Nasa rocket heading to the moon! oh sorry that refers to clutch springs...
Your right it's fork caps that launch skywards

When undoing these I put on a pair of grippy gloves so i can turn the socket by hand, once loose enough to turn by hand I will cover everything with a towel

Clutch springs ah now you must be talking about brit stuff here

What they used to do was launch horizontally hit you in the nuts then bounce down the road until they found a drain to fall down.

All of the jap clutches I have worked on the tension comes off before the bolt's come loose

Ah the joy of British bike clutch centre nuts coming undone every few hundred miles then trying to fix it at the side of the road then getting hit in the nuts then loosing the nuts down the drain
Then the feeling of elation when you discovered lok tite and realised how much better it was than the old tab washers
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  #43  
Old 22-02-2016, 09:14 PM
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Your right it's fork caps
Otherwise known as ping-fukits.
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  #44  
Old 23-02-2016, 10:02 AM
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The battery on me car went futt click clickclickclickclickclick

So I bought a new one and struggled to get the old one out from Uncle Henry's death like grip.

Then just for a change I struggled to fit the new one. The battery is retained by a strap over the top of it which is held down by two nuts onto studs. The gaps of course between the battery and the rest of the car are too small for the hand of man to enter.

So to remove the nuts we put a blob of grease in the socket and can then lift the nuts out with the socket. The alternative is of course magnets if the nuts are mild steel or the little flexible grabber etc.

However putting the nuts back on can be a bigger problem, the method I chose was to slip the nut onto a long thin scewdriver. Then while holding the nut with the same hand that holds the screwdriver place the tip of the screwdriver on the top of the stud, let the nut fall down the screwdriver blade and start it by turning it with the one finger that can reach it.

sometimes you can use the socket and grease method to replace the nut but as I needed a deep socket, due to the length of the stud, I would need to put several nuts in the socket in order to press the nut on to the top of the stud.
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  #45  
Old 24-02-2016, 04:51 AM
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Wouldn't buying a long reach nut spinner be easier?

*runs like f**K!*
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  #46  
Old 24-02-2016, 11:20 AM
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I was thinking that - but then I have one!
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  #47  
Old 25-02-2016, 08:47 AM
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Wouldn't buying a long reach nut spinner be easier?

*runs like f**K!*
Well for one I aint got one, I always assumed that my socket sets cover that with lots of deep sockets and spinner handles etc.

So do the nut spinners hold the nut or are we messing about with grease or magnets again ?
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  #48  
Old 25-02-2016, 10:14 AM
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Default Fancy fittings, and anodised fork tubes

You know the sort of thing I'm talking about here

Anodized, powder coated, and chromed nuts bolt's etc how do we deal with these

Cover either the fixing or your socket with a plastic bag this help's prevent scratching the finish of these often expensive item's

I have noticed that anodised fork tubes are becoming popular how do we get these through the yokes without scratching them,?
I use liquid soap not washing up liquid
When removing them coat between the yokes before backing off the pinch bolt's
When refitting give the fork tubes a good coat before sliding them back onto the yokes

Liquid soap can be used for a lot of job's where you may scratch painted surfaces like fitting mudguards, squeezing sissy bar fittings between the seat rails and mudguard etc,
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Last edited by wiskers; 25-02-2016 at 10:34 AM.
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  #49  
Old 25-02-2016, 10:23 AM
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Well for one I aint got one, I always assumed that my socket sets cover that with lots of deep sockets and spinner handles etc.

So do the nut spinners hold the nut or are we messing about with grease or magnets again ?
I had some that were magnetic they got stolen the set i got to replace them are not so they are somewhere in the garage gathering dust,
The problem with them is you need to get straight on to the stud etc if you can do this I find a quarter drive socket set far better especially if you have wobble bar's

The beauty of your screwdriver idea is you can get the nut on even if you come in at an angle
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  #50  
Old 25-02-2016, 08:24 PM
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Default Use a bit of heat on seized bolts.

Old trick and it works.
Using a heat lamp of the gas canister type, apply a gentle flame to the stubborn bolt. This can save a bolt from shearing and many days of wondering wtf do I do now?

There are a lot of things to be extremely cautious of when using a naked flame on or near your bike. So experienced hands only for this one. I'm sure you can appreciate the kind of materials and liquids that react very badly to naked flames.

But a good example of this is my neighbour who is allegedly a top mechanic for the post office working on delivery vans. I asked him to fit a pair of new rear shock absorbers on my car to save me time and back pain last winter.
After 15 minutes I went out to see what he needed in the way of a mug of tea and he said the pinch bolt was very tight on the bottom of the shock. So I said stop! !! You need some heat on that bolt or you'll bust it!! I told him to wait 1 minute until I was back with a gas lamp from my garage. So I dashed off to get it.
1 minute later I came back with the gas lamp and he had ignored me and gone ahead and sheared the bolt.
It took him 4 hours to get the bust thread out before he could finish one shock. The other side took 20 minutes because he did use my gas lamp on the pinch bolt to the other shock.
He has not worked on my car since.
Mechanic my arse....

Getting sheared bolts out when there is just thread left in the hole is best to avoid. I have never found easi-outs to be successful in this situation.

Last edited by HOS; 25-02-2016 at 08:26 PM.
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  #51  
Old 25-02-2016, 08:40 PM
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Default How to remove stickers and tank pads.

Talking of heat, another question that comes up often on the boards is how to remove old stickers or the ghastly safety stickers plastered all over your bike.

Easy ! Avoid using solvents or white spirit or wd40.
It is this easy!!!
Use a hairdryer. Or ask your good lady very nicely if you can borrow hers? That might be the tricky part especially if you tell her you want to use it in the garage.
But I've got a heatgun which is just like a hairdryer but looks more rugged lol.

Just apply it carefully ok. Extreme caution not to melt any plastic or painted surfaces! Just gently and you can feel with a finger nail if the edge of the sticker will lift for you to peel it off in one piece.
You can apply more heat if it's not quite ready to lift.
Tried and tested it works.

However on some bikes the stickers or bike graphics are applied and then a layer or two of clear lacquer is sprayed over them.
If the stickers have been lacquered over this method will not work!
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  #52  
Old 27-02-2016, 10:37 AM
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Default Master cylinder leaking!

You notice your master cylinder leaking after working on your brake's

Nine times out of ten what has happened is when you removed the cap you put it on the bench upside down, the fluid on the diaphragm rundown down into the cap, when you replace the cap it runs down from the cap and out the vent looking like a leak.

Then people tighten it further the leak appears to stop, but what you have done is overtightened (spelin ) the cap and closed the vent (bad idea as the diaphragm will no longer work and you risk warping the cap causing further leaks )

The answer to this is put the cap down upside up (put it on a clean cloth or kitchen roll) and just nip up the screws when replacing them
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  #53  
Old 27-02-2016, 12:19 PM
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Default Breaker bars

Do you need them?
Only you know the answer to that but if your doing heavy work like removing and replacing wheels or engine mounts then the answer is yes you may get away with using your ratchet but ratchets are fragile when used for heavy work.

I have a few a 2' and 18" 1/2" drive also a 3/8" and a 1/4" these will cover most undoing jobs

What make to buy? to be honest it doesn't seem to matter even the cheap 1/2" one's seem pretty tough, for the smaller one's i went with blue point available from your friendly snap on man, expensive sure but I haven't managed to break them

Infact the only breaker bar I have broken was a 2' 1/2" snap on one i managed to twist off the flex drive part my own fault I had a 4' scaffold tube on it, the snap on man gave us a free repair kit with no questions asked

Story time how the hell do you break a breaker bar?
I often do a bit in my mates garage we had a transit come in for new brakes front and back, so this was a job for me the front went fine no problem at all when i came to do the rear's it was a different story, first I tried the rattle gun to remove the left hand rear wheel (left hand thread on these) no go so I decided to get out the gas axe and heat the wheel nuts then use the breaker bar on them, did this work? Did it hell, then I grabbed the scaffold tube, (this is how you break a breaker bar ) right give up on that side try the other side, this time I heated the nuts then tried the old trick of tightening them before undoing the bloody thing came undone easily when tightened some daft bugger had swapped the bloody hubs putting the left hand threaded drum on the right and the right hand threaded one on the left!
After discovering this the job was straightforward enough and the hubs were put back on the correct side, the only problem was the bloody nut that i had inadvertently tightened with all my weight on a 4' scaffold tube

Edit yes the studs are marked with an L on the left hub or should be but I didn't look
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Last edited by wiskers; 27-02-2016 at 02:28 PM.
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  #54  
Old 28-02-2016, 07:52 PM
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Priceless story there Dai.
A breaker bar is an essential tool.
I got one off a tool stall on a market.
1/2 inch drive and a good 1.2m long.
Give it some bloody gyp !!!!
Swingarm nuts give in to this!
And rear axle nuts which have been over tightened.
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  #55  
Old 28-02-2016, 07:57 PM
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Classic rear axle nut over tightened:

My 4th Busa in the shed.
Breaker bar with heavy 32mm socket.
My little lady sitting on the bike.
With me lifting the bar with both hands.
Not only was my little lady pushing down with her arms
on the shed roof, but I was lifting her and the bike off the floor
and still the nut wouldn't move.
Had to work another way around that problem.
Bike had been owned by a bike technician ? ???
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  #56  
Old 29-02-2016, 09:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HOS View Post
Classic rear axle nut over tightened:

My 4th Busa in the shed.
Breaker bar with heavy 32mm socket.
My little lady sitting on the bike.
With me lifting the bar with both hands.
Not only was my little lady pushing down with her arms
on the shed roof, but I was lifting her and the bike off the floor
and still the nut wouldn't move.
Had to work another way around that problem.
Bike had been owned by a bike technician ? ???
Find a heavier lady?
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  #57  
Old 01-03-2016, 11:24 AM
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Default Budget tools

When on a budget it's tempting to pick up tools made in China, all i can say about this is while some may be ok others will be crap that will cost you money in the end, so they are best to avoid, I do have a 3/4" drive socket set that's made in China for the amount of use it gets it wasn't worth buying a good set it's mainly used for car hub nuts and does the job but it is pretty ugly and nasty to use

So where does that leave us second hand can work out really well but you may get stung that nice second hand socket set may be in a snap on box but might just be a cheap set in a snap on box

Look for tools made in Taiwan some makes to look out for include,

US Pro, most of my impact impact bits and pieces are this make
Burgen, torque wrenches good loud click and seem pretty accurate
Neilsen, some of the nicest ratchets I have used, well the tear drop headed one's are i don't like their round head one's
Silverline, some be careful, their impact sockets are very good and cheap, other stuff seems Chinese
Halfords pro, good value in their many sales
Sealey premier range, breaker bar's great and spare heads available,
Clarke pro, good value socket sets some awful ratchets newer sets come with better ratchets
Draper expert, lovely 1/4" drive socket set's
There are others but i can't think of any off the top of my head

Did you know many of the top makes have tool's made there.
Over the last few years snap on have bought up some very well respected tool companies
Bacho, Still make the best adjustable spanners you can get, their socket set's are something very special
Sandvik,
Facom, still making lovely ratchet screwdrivers
Stanley, surprisingly some very nice socket set's, to be honest i thought they made hammers and very little else, that'll teach me to open my eyes eh!
To name a few, most of the tools you buy with these names will be made in Taiwan in the same factories that make the tools listed above

Hopefully this will help set your mind at rest about some of the tool's out there
You don't need to spend a fortune on good tool's

Infact i have just picked up a 13 piece impact socket set Sealey from amazon for less than 13 and a set of deep 3/8" flank drive coloured sockets Neilsen For less than 12, both sets delivered at that price, ok the sockets are lacquered over chrome so the colour won't last should have saved a couple of quid and got the chrome finish one's, however i am very impressed with the fit and finish of these
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Last edited by wiskers; 12-03-2016 at 02:31 PM. Reason: Adding bit's and spelin
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  #58  
Old 03-03-2016, 01:55 PM
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Default Keep fingers and other bits away from power tool's

Firstly I must point out it's not my finger and i don't know who's it is
Don't take nuts out of sockets with your fingers when there still on the rattle//windy gun
[IMG][/IMG]

Edit. I dread to think what he'd of put in there if he had a bigger nut and socket on the windy gun
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Last edited by wiskers; 04-03-2016 at 08:18 PM.
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  #59  
Old 04-03-2016, 06:30 AM
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Rubber lubrication spray (Silicone)

Very handy for rubbers when putting them back in.
Ooerr Missus!
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  #60  
Old 04-03-2016, 09:35 PM
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Ooerr Missus!
Lmho !!!
I was waiting!!
Fnarrr.....
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