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  #1  
Old 20-06-2010, 02:08 AM
sl23k sl23k is offline
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Question Hello and Helpppp!!!!!

Hello all just signed up in the hope that someone here can give me a definative answer to 1 simple question.

I ant to build a trike but before i do i wish to make sure i can actually ride it legally
I have a full Cat A licence issued after 2001 so therefore no cat B1 after several conversations including 1 with a high up in the DSA no one seems to know the legalities of trikes :S

after trawling the net for the last few days i am even more confused if that is possible

according to the dvla

Motorcycle = Bicycles, 3-wheelers under 450kg unladen

so there fore if it is motorcycle powered and within the 450kg weight technically i am covered on my licence ????

then i find this paragraph on another site which confused the hell out of me

You can ride a trike on a provisional car licence, ie. with "L" plates, but you must be 17 ( or 16 if you are getting Disability Living Allowance at the higher rate for the mobility component ) and the trike must have only one seat; the rider's seat. If you do wish to carry passengers, your trike can have extra seats, but you must carry a qualified bike or car licence holder with you at all times; this is also dependant, of course, on which sort of trike your accompanying full licence holder is qualified to ride

so does this mean i have to have "L" plates and can only carry a full licence holder as a passenger even though i am a full licence holder myself ??

now my brain is totally fried then this bigwig from the "DSA" who was assessing a friend who is a instructor piped up with the answer no it is to do with the wheel base and if it is over 18 inches i cant ride it on a class A licence hmmmmmmmmm the distance between the front and rear wheel on my R1 is approx 22" so does that mean i cant ride that ??? also looking at some of the commercially available trikes out there i,e the new CAN AM the front wheels look far more than 18" so according to him i cant even ride that

so does anyone have the definative answer to this or even know where i can go to find it out before anyone pipes up "DVLA" dont i have searched and searched that site and no i cant find a answer on there also when i pointed out to both my friend the instructor (DAS) and DSA guy there are 50cc trikes which can be ridden on a motorcycle provisional at 16 they both looked blank lol

so here is my dilemma i want a trike for a winter fun project and to use mainly in the winter getting too old to blast the R1 through rain sleet and snow and also 3 wheels looks less likely to slip on snow and ice well least i will not be laying there this year making snow angels as the bike slides down the road minus the side panels lol so if i power it with a bike engine and it has no more than 3 wheels and weighs below 450 / 410 Kg i can ride it on my licence without going through hell ?

oh reason i put 450 / 410 kilos is because dvla doc specifies 450Kg and vosa doc specifies 410Kg yet another confusing conflict

So if anyone can clear this up please please please put my poor tortured mind out of its misery

not worried about the msva or even the build but not going to go to the expense of building and kitting it out to find out i can't enjoy it thanks all and sorry about the rambling on and on

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  #2  
Old 20-06-2010, 03:23 AM
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I don't know the answer to this now, but when I passed my bike test in 1963 I was entitled to ride a trike as part of the group, which in those days covered all three wheelers..so it might depend on what groups were covered when you passed your test. have you looked at you license to see if you are covered for more than one group...

And welcome to the forum.

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Old 20-06-2010, 07:25 AM
matthewmosse matthewmosse is offline
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I'm in the same boat as you on this one, personally I'd interpreted the rules as being that it depended on whether the trike is registred as a motorcycle or car derived which is where the weight and desighn things kick in, I'm not 100% on this but I think there might be issues around new build car derived trikes over 450 kilo thanks to sva because of changes to sva rules, but the msva still allows most trikes, this was covered in crap detail by a kit car mag a year or more ago and was in broad terms talking about heavy car derived vehicles and assuming that the reader was building a kit so not really relevant
Back to the point, you and the law plus riding with extra wheel in winter. Being pragmatic, I'd say stuff the trike idea, get a sidecar outfit, they rule in snow, are an absolute hoot to ride/drive and are real crowd pullers, unfortunately you WILL get bored with being told 'I/ My husband/ dad had one of them' and 'You don't see many of these things these days' Alternatively, build a 1 seater trike, shove on L plates and screw them, better have L plates and not need them. Like you I've found DSA and DVLA to be utterly useless in answering a simple question of what I'm entitled to ride/ drive on the road. They'd rather issue you with a tickett after the event than actually tell you what all their changes actually mean
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Old 20-06-2010, 08:51 AM
sl23k sl23k is offline
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Default hmmmmmmmmmmm

problem with running "L" plates is you cant use motorways so i would be stuffed
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Old 20-06-2010, 09:42 AM
sl23k sl23k is offline
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Default just to add a little more confusion

found this today on the vehicle certification website

3. UK National Regulations – The Road Vehicles (Construction and
Use) Regulations 1986 and The Road Vehicles Lighting Regulations 1989
(C&U and RVLR)
3.1 Definitions
Motorcycle - a vehicle having less than four wheels and weighing less than 410kg unladen.
This definition includes three wheeled motorcycles and three-wheel mopeds:
Three Wheeled Motorcycle - a motorcycle having three wheels, not including a motorcycle and
sidecar.
Moped - a motorcycle weighing less than 250kg and with a maximum design speed not greater
than 30mph. If the engine is an internal combustion engine its capacity must not exceed 50cm3.
Propelling pedals are not required.

so another gov agency stating if below 410Kg its a motorcycle
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Old 20-06-2010, 10:53 AM
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Just google Trike Law all the answers are there and very easy to understand.

ps. Like John, I passed me test when all you had to do was bribe the man with the red flag.
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Old 20-06-2010, 11:10 AM
sl23k sl23k is offline
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Default google smoogle

have tried google and the laws are not clear as you can see from my orriginal post dvla vosa and the dsa all have different descriptions now add to this the description from hm customs

Part II

Motorcycles

2
(1)
The annual rate of vehicle excise duty applicable to a motorcycle which does not exceed 450 kilograms in weight unladen is— .
(a)
£15 if the cylinder capacity of the engine does not exceed 150 cubic centimetres, .
(b)
£35 if the vehicle is a motorbicycle and the cylinder capacity of the engine exceeds 150 cubic centimetres but does not exceed 250 cubic centimetres, and .
(c)
£55 otherwise. .
(2)
Where a motorbicycle which was constructed before 1933 has an engine the cylinder capacity of which exceeds 150 cubic centimetres, it is to be treated for the purposes of sub-paragraph (1) as having an engine the cylinder capacity of which does not exceed 150 cubic centimetres. .
(3)
In this paragraph— .
“motorcycle” means a motorbicycle or a motortricycle,
“motorbicycle” includes a two-wheeled motor scooter, a bicycle with an attachment for propelling it by mechanical power and a motorbicycle to which a side-car is attached, and
“motortricycle” includes a three-wheeled motor scooter and a tricycle with an attachment for propelling it by mechanical power.
(4)
For the purposes of this paragraph the cylinder capacity of an engine shall be calculated in accordance with regulations made by the Secretary of State.

so yet again we have the 450Kg and 410Kg discrepency
and a description of a motorcycle as being a vehicle with less than 4 wheels

so if trike law is that easy to follow why cant all these gov agencies agree on weights and descriptions and what is a motorcycle and what is not ????
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Old 20-06-2010, 12:37 PM
matthewmosse matthewmosse is offline
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I'd buy the msva manual, follow the rules set down there and then it should end up as motorcycle under the definitions that matter, ie if it says its a motorcycle or tricycle on the log book that should satisfy the plod if you get pulled. Try to keep to the lower of the 2 weights indicated to play safe if that's a big bother, chances are unless you are caught pulling a big trailer than only time the thing will ever be checked for weight is the msva test. If it passes an msva than it's a motorcycle by definition is it not
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Old 20-06-2010, 12:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sl23k View Post
Hello all just signed up in the hope that someone here can give me a definative answer to 1 simple question.

I ant to build a trike but before i do i wish to make sure i can actually ride it legally
I have a full Cat A licence issued after 2001 so therefore no cat B1 after several conversations including 1 with a high up in the DSA no one seems to know the legalities of trikes :S

after trawling the net for the last few days i am even more confused if that is possible

according to the dvla

Motorcycle = Bicycles, 3-wheelers under 450kg unladen

so there fore if it is motorcycle powered and within the 450kg weight technically i am covered on my licence ????

then i find this paragraph on another site which confused the hell out of me

You can ride a trike on a provisional car licence, ie. with "L" plates, but you must be 17 ( or 16 if you are getting Disability Living Allowance at the higher rate for the mobility component ) and the trike must have only one seat; the rider's seat. If you do wish to carry passengers, your trike can have extra seats, but you must carry a qualified bike or car licence holder with you at all times; this is also dependant, of course, on which sort of trike your accompanying full licence holder is qualified to ride

so does this mean i have to have "L" plates and can only carry a full licence holder as a passenger even though i am a full licence holder myself ??

now my brain is totally fried then this bigwig from the "DSA" who was assessing a friend who is a instructor piped up with the answer no it is to do with the wheel base and if it is over 18 inches i cant ride it on a class A licence hmmmmmmmmm the distance between the front and rear wheel on my R1 is approx 22" so does that mean i cant ride that ??? also looking at some of the commercially available trikes out there i,e the new CAN AM the front wheels look far more than 18" so according to him i cant even ride that

so does anyone have the definative answer to this or even know where i can go to find it out before anyone pipes up "DVLA" dont i have searched and searched that site and no i cant find a answer on there also when i pointed out to both my friend the instructor (DAS) and DSA guy there are 50cc trikes which can be ridden on a motorcycle provisional at 16 they both looked blank lol

so here is my dilemma i want a trike for a winter fun project and to use mainly in the winter getting too old to blast the R1 through rain sleet and snow and also 3 wheels looks less likely to slip on snow and ice well least i will not be laying there this year making snow angels as the bike slides down the road minus the side panels lol so if i power it with a bike engine and it has no more than 3 wheels and weighs below 450 / 410 Kg i can ride it on my licence without going through hell ?

oh reason i put 450 / 410 kilos is because dvla doc specifies 450Kg and vosa doc specifies 410Kg yet another confusing conflict

So if anyone can clear this up please please please put my poor tortured mind out of its misery

not worried about the msva or even the build but not going to go to the expense of building and kitting it out to find out i can't enjoy it thanks all and sorry about the rambling on and on

Welcome fellow newbie to the site!
I ride my trike on my full car licence and nothing is said. I don't think it matters what size your engine is. As long as you have a full car driving licence, then you can ride what you like.
Hope this helps.
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Old 20-06-2010, 12:59 PM
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First the easy bit


You can ride a trike on a provisional car licence, ie. with "L" plates, but you must be 17 ( or 16 if you are getting Disability Living Allowance at the higher rate for the mobility component ) and the trike must have only one seat; the rider's seat. If you do wish to carry passengers, your trike can have extra seats, but you must carry a qualified bike or car licence holder with you at all times; this is also dependant, of course, on which sort of trike your accompanying full licence holder is qualified to ride

If you haven't got any license you can apply for a provisional license and ride a trike with L plates providing it only has one seat...This way if you crash you don't take anyone with you..

So if you don't have the correct group on your license then you don't have a license.

If you have more than one seat the rules are the same as for a car, you can only drive with a provisional license when you are accompanied by a qualified driver.

As for the age thing you are obviously over 17 so that doesn't apply.

Now the other bit..

I want to build a trike but before i do i wish to make sure i can actually ride it legally
I have a full Cat A licence issued after 2001 so therefore no cat B1 after several conversations including 1 with a high up in the DSA no one seems to know the legalities of trikes



Building a trike will cost you a lot more than buying a ready built one and you may not be up to it so..

consider buying a used trike at a reasonable price that you can pass your test on...or you could apply to have the B1 added to your existing license...it has been done before.

John
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  #11  
Old 20-06-2010, 01:03 PM
sl23k sl23k is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bikerbabesmile View Post
Welcome fellow newbie to the site!
I ride my trike on my full car licence and nothing is said. I don't think it matters what size your engine is. As long as you have a full car driving licence, then you can ride what you like.
Hope this helps.

nope it is no help sorry as i have a full motorcycle licence never liked 4 wheels lol
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  #12  
Old 20-06-2010, 01:09 PM
sl23k sl23k is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Hopkins View Post
First the easy bit


You can ride a trike on a provisional car licence, ie. with "L" plates, but you must be 17 ( or 16 if you are getting Disability Living Allowance at the higher rate for the mobility component ) and the trike must have only one seat; the rider's seat. If you do wish to carry passengers, your trike can have extra seats, but you must carry a qualified bike or car licence holder with you at all times; this is also dependant, of course, on which sort of trike your accompanying full licence holder is qualified to ride

If you haven't got any license you can apply for a provisional license and ride a trike with L plates providing it only has one seat...This way if you crash you don't take anyone with you..

So if you don't have the correct group on your license then you don't have a license.

If you have more than one seat the rules are the same as for a car, you can only drive with a provisional license when you are accompanied by a qualified driver.

As for the age thing you are obviously over 17 so that doesn't apply.

Now the other bit..

I want to build a trike but before i do i wish to make sure i can actually ride it legally
I have a full Cat A licence issued after 2001 so therefore no cat B1 after several conversations including 1 with a high up in the DSA no one seems to know the legalities of trikes



Building a trike will cost you a lot more than buying a ready built one and you may not be up to it so..

consider buying a used trike at a reasonable price that you can pass your test on...or you could apply to have the B1 added to your existing license...it has been done before.

John


ok but my question is still unanswered

If you do wish to carry passengers, your trike can have extra seats, but you must carry a qualified bike or car licence holder with you at all times

i am a qualified bike licence holder so could i legally take a passenger ? i can take a pillion on my bike so how does a trike differ surely it is a safer vehicle


consider buying a used trike at a reasonable price that you can pass your test on...or you could apply to have the B1 added to your existing license...it has been done before

as i stated i want this for a winter project and i am up to it lol according to dvla cat B1 no longer exists
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Old 20-06-2010, 01:15 PM
sl23k sl23k is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by matthewmosse View Post
I'd buy the msva manual, follow the rules set down there and then it should end up as motorcycle under the definitions that matter, ie if it says its a motorcycle or tricycle on the log book that should satisfy the plod if you get pulled. Try to keep to the lower of the 2 weights indicated to play safe if that's a big bother, chances are unless you are caught pulling a big trailer than only time the thing will ever be checked for weight is the msva test. If it passes an msva than it's a motorcycle by definition is it not
MSVA is also a little ambiguous because it covers motorcycles, light trikes, heavy trikes and quadracycles yet by their own definition it is a motorcycle single vehicle acreditation yet i know for definate i can not drive a quad as its taxation class is PLG i.e same as a car but then the taxation classes of a trike fall into 2 classes
light and heavy 410/550 kg respectively and now people are quoting 1000kg surely that then is a different class yet again

Last edited by sl23k; 20-06-2010 at 01:20 PM.
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Old 20-06-2010, 02:07 PM
sl23k sl23k is offline
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Default just to add further problems

just found this


Compulsory Basic Training (CBT) :-
Can only be carried out with Approved Training Bodies using qualified Instructors, all regulated by the Driving Standards Agency and the course content laid down by law.

A CBT obtained on a moped is also valid for motorcycle (at 17 yrs. old).

If you passed a full moped test after 1st Dec 1990, you don't need a CBT for motorcycle.

Residents on some remote islands are exempt from CBT (but only on those islands). Check with DVLA / DSA if you think your location may be exempt.

If you do your CBT on a motorcycle with sidecar or a moped with more than 2 wheels, your provisional entitlement will be restricted to that same type of vehicle.

You can do a CBT using a motorcycle & sidecar combination or other 3 wheeler but, if you do, then your CBT will be qualified and only valid for 3 wheelers

so when is a 3 wheeler classified as a motorcycle and when is it not
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Old 20-06-2010, 04:36 PM
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Just to put my five pennorth in here.

Don't confuse "Vehicle" categories with "Driving" licence categories.

One is fish and the other is fowl.

All the MSVA stuff relates to the vehicle and what it will be registered as.
But this has nowt to do with who can legally ride the thing.

The vehicle groups for the one differ from the other God bless the EU.
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Old 20-06-2010, 04:43 PM
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This may help

http://www.transportsfriend.org/road.../category.html

If you've got B1

3 or 4 wheel motor vehicles not exceeding 550 kg unladen (Quadricycles)
If they exceed 550kg they fall into Cat B

You are ok up to 550 kg
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Last edited by harry; 20-06-2010 at 04:46 PM.
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Old 20-06-2010, 05:29 PM
sl23k sl23k is offline
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Default No b1 :(

but according to half the documents it is only vehicles above 410 / 450 Kgs that fall in to b1 below this they fall in to A talk about grey areas lol

as i stated earlier from vehicle classification website

3. UK National Regulations – The Road Vehicles (Construction and
Use) Regulations 1986 and The Road Vehicles Lighting Regulations 1989
(C&U and RVLR)
3.1 Definitions
Motorcycle - a vehicle having less than four wheels and weighing less than 410kg unladen.
This definition includes three wheeled motorcycles and three-wheel mopeds:
Three Wheeled Motorcycle - a motorcycle having three wheels, not including a motorcycle and
sidecar.
Moped - a motorcycle weighing less than 250kg and with a maximum design speed not greater
than 30mph. If the engine is an internal combustion engine its capacity must not exceed 50cm3.
Propelling pedals are not required.
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Old 20-06-2010, 05:42 PM
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Default road traffic act ammendment

Amendment of the Road Traffic Act 1988
3. In the Road Traffic Act 1988[7] in section 85 (interpretation of Part II) -



(a) in the definition of "EC certificate of conformity", for paragraph (b) there shall be substituted -


" (b) in the case of a vehicle to which the motorcycle type approval Directive applies, any certificate of conformity -


(i) issued by a manufacturer under regulation 8(1) of the Motor Cycles Etc. (EC Type Approval) Regulations 1999, whether before, on or after 9th November 2003, or

(ii) issued by a manufacturer under any provision of the law of an EEA State other than the United Kingdom giving effect to Article 7(1) of the motorcycle type approval directive or to Article 7(1) of Council Directive 92/61/EEC of 30th June 1992 relating to the type approval of two or three-wheeled motor vehicles," and



(b) for the definition of "the motorcycle type approval Directive" there shall be substituted -




" "the motorcycle type approval Directive" means Directive 2002/24/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 18th March 2002 relating to the type approval of two or three-wheel motor vehicles and repealing Council Directive 92/61/EEC, as corrected by a Corrigendum of 22nd February 2003,".



and here is the road traffic act 1988

section 185 vehicle inyterpretation

185
Meaning of “motor vehicle” and other expressions relating to vehicles .(1)
In this Act— .
“heavy locomotive” means a mechanically propelled vehicle which is not constructed itself to carry a load other than any of the excepted articles and the weight of which unladen exceeds 11690 kilograms,
“heavy motor car” means a mechanically propelled vehicle, not being a motor car, which is constructed itself to carry a load or passengers and the weight of which unladen exceeds 2540 kilograms,
“invalid carriage” means a mechanically propelled vehicle the weight of which unladen does not exceed 254 kilograms and which is specially designed and constructed, and not merely adapted, for the use of a person suffering from some physical defect or disability and is used solely by such a person,
“light locomotive” means a mechanically propelled vehicle which is not constructed itself to carry a load other than any of the excepted articles and the weight of which unladen does not exceed 11690 kilograms but does exceed 7370 kilograms,
“motor car” means a mechanically propelled vehicle, not being a motor cycle or an invalid carriage, which is constructed itself to carry a load or passengers and the weight of which unladen—
(a)
if it is constructed solely for the carriage of passengers and their effects, is adapted to carry not more than seven passengers exclusive of the driver and is fitted with tyres of such type as may be specified in regulations made by the Secretary of State, does not exceed 3050 kilograms, .
(b)
if it is constructed or adapted for use for the conveyance of goods or burden of any description, does not exceed 3050 kilograms, or 3500 kilograms if the vehicle carries a container or containers for holding for the purposes of its propulsion any fuel which is wholly gaseous at 17.5 degrees Celsius under a pressure of 1.013 bar or plant and materials for producing such fuel, .
(c)
does not exceed 2540 kilograms in a case not falling within sub-paragraph (a) or (b) above, .
“motor cycle” means a mechanically propelled vehicle, not being an invalid carriage, with less than four wheels and the weight of which unladen does not exceed 410 kilograms,
“motor tractor” means a mechanically propelled vehicle which is not constructed itself to carry a load, other than the excepted articles, and the weight of which unladen does not exceed 7370 kilograms,
“motor vehicle” means, subject to section 20 of the [1970 c. 44.] Chronically Sick and Disabled Persons Act 1970 (which makes special provision about invalid carriages, within the meaning of that Act), a mechanically propelled vehicle intended or adapted for use on roads, and
“trailer” means a vehicle drawn by a motor vehicle.
(2)
In subsection (1) above “excepted articles” means any of the following: water, fuel, accumulators and other equipment used for the purpose of propulsion, loose tools and loose equipment. .
186
Supplementary provisions about those expressions .(1)
For the purposes of section 185 of this Act, a side car attached to a motor vehicle, if it complies with such conditions as may be specified in regulations made by the Secretary of State, is to be regarded as forming part of the vehicle to which it is attached and as not being a trailer. .
(2)
For the purposes of section 185 of this Act, in a case where a motor vehicle is so constructed that a trailer may by partial super-imposition be attached to the vehicle in such a manner as to cause a substantial part of the weight of the trailer to be borne by the vehicle, that vehicle is to be deemed to be a vehicle itself constructed to carry a load. .
(3)
For the purposes of section 185 of this Act, in the case of a motor vehicle fitted with a crane, dynamo, welding plant or other special appliance or apparatus which is a permanent or essentially permanent fixture, the appliance or apparatus is not to be deemed to constitute a load or goods or burden of any description, but is to be deemed to form part of the vehicle. .
(4)
The Secretary of State may by regulations vary any of the maximum or minimum weights specified in section 185 of this Act. .
(5)
Regulations under subsection (4) above may have effect— .
(a)
either generally or in the case of vehicles of any class specified in the regulations, and .
(b)
either for the purposes of the provisions of the Road Traffic Acts and of all regulations made under those provisions or for such of those purposes as may be so specified. .
(6)
Nothing in section 86 of the [1984 c. 27.] Road Traffic Regulation Act 1984 limits the powers conferred by subsection (4) above.

Last edited by sl23k; 20-06-2010 at 08:00 PM.
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Old 20-06-2010, 06:59 PM
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Default HMRC definition of a motorcycle

Motor cycles are specifically included in the definition of a car for capital allowances purposes where the expenditure was incurred before 1 or 6 April 2009. Expenditure incurred on a motor cycle after these dates is not treated as being on the provision of a car. A motor cycle is defined (in the Road Traffic Act of 1988) as a mechanically propelled vehicle, other than an invalid carriage, with less than four wheels. The unladen weight must not be more than 410 kilograms.

Quadricycles (quadbikes) do not meet the definition of a ‘motorcycle’ and if they are road vehicles within the definition above then they will be treated as cars for capital allowances purposes
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Old 20-06-2010, 08:49 PM
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John Hopkins John Hopkins is offline
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I think we may be getting bogged down here.

I think one of your questions is something like this.

I have passed my bike test and can carry a passenger on the back of my bike so why can't I carry a passenger on a trike which by definition is a three wheeled bike. or can I...


I think the answer, due to the removal of the B1 cat. is because the law has changed and you need a car license to ride a trike unless you passed your test before oct 2000.

If you passed before oct 2000 you probably would be able to apply for a B1 cat to be applied to your license.

These two sites will clarify that point.

http://webstarter.easily.co.uk/users...=data_home&a=4

and

http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/Motoring...ons/DG_4022548

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Last edited by John Hopkins; 20-06-2010 at 08:52 PM.
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Old 20-06-2010, 09:12 PM
sl23k sl23k is offline
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Default my question is this the same as i asked orriginally

if i build a 3 wheeled vehicle using a motorcycle as the donor and keep it below 410 Kgs can i use it on my full A entitlement as the definition of a motorcycle in the road traffic act is
“motor cycle” means a mechanically propelled vehicle, not being an invalid carriage, with less than four wheels and the weight of which unladen does not exceed 410 kilograms,
not interested in the B1 entitlement but wether what i want is legal or not
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Old 20-06-2010, 09:38 PM
sl23k sl23k is offline
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Default what is this ????

weighs 390Kg
retains orriginal donor bikes id
has 3 wheels






Last edited by sl23k; 20-06-2010 at 09:41 PM.
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Old 20-06-2010, 10:03 PM
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if i build a 3 wheeled vehicle using a motorcycle as the donor and keep it below 410 Kgs can i use it on my full A entitlement as the definition of a motorcycle in the road traffic act is
“motor cycle” means a mechanically propelled vehicle, not being an invalid carriage, with less than four wheels and the weight of which unladen does not exceed 410 kilograms,
not interested in the B1 entitlement but wether what i want is legal or not
No you can't ride a trike with that license.

It doesn't matter how the Inland revenue tax a vehicle or what the vehicle was before it was triked.
It don't matter how the vehicle is classed for type approval or Construction and Use.

It's the driving license categories that matter for what you can drive.

Sorry
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Old 20-06-2010, 10:05 PM
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Originally Posted by sl23k View Post
if i build a 3 wheeled vehicle using a motorcycle as the donor and keep it below 410 Kgs can i use it on my full A entitlement as the definition of a motorcycle in the road traffic act is
“motor cycle” means a mechanically propelled vehicle, not being an invalid carriage, with less than four wheels and the weight of which unladen does not exceed 410 kilograms,
not interested in the B1 entitlement but wether what i want is legal or not
It is a tricycle.......not a motorbike. Bike front end or not.
Would it be possible to take your car test. ?
John knows his stuff....as Harry. I shudder to think of their combined age and experiance.

Last edited by Beano; 20-06-2010 at 10:07 PM.
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  #25  
Old 20-06-2010, 10:15 PM
sl23k sl23k is offline
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Originally Posted by harry View Post
No you can't ride a trike with that license.

It doesn't matter how the Inland revenue tax a vehicle or what the vehicle was before it was triked.
It don't matter how the vehicle is classed for type approval or Construction and Use.

It's the driving license categories that matter for what you can drive.

Sorry
but the road traffic act classes it as a motorcycle so surely it is
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  #26  
Old 20-06-2010, 10:17 PM
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weighs 390Kg
retains orriginal donor bikes id
has 3 wheels





OK that has car steering so not on a bike license I believe.
You passed your test in 2001 so you can only ride a single seater 410KG or less on 'L' plates on a provisional car license, not sure if your full A license acts as a provisional or not.
We built a trike for my lad to ride when he turned 17 on 'L's but the insurance was a joke so he has never got to ride it on the road yet.
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  #27  
Old 20-06-2010, 10:20 PM
sl23k sl23k is offline
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got provisional b licence so just a single seater or licenced passenger then
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  #28  
Old 20-06-2010, 10:25 PM
sl23k sl23k is offline
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have now come to the conclusion the uk laws are shite lol

i have a full cat a licence but cant drive a trike which is defined as a 3 wheeled vehicle and 9 times out of 10 has a bike front end

but mr smith passes his car licence and can drive a quad which has all motorcycle controlls and a motorbike with 3 wheels and motor bike controlls

is that not a daft law
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  #29  
Old 20-06-2010, 10:37 PM
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have now come to the conclusion the uk laws are shite lol

i have a full cat a licence but cant drive a trike which is defined as a 3 wheeled vehicle and 9 times out of 10 has a bike front end

but mr smith passes his car licence and can drive a quad which has all motorcycle controlls and a motorbike with 3 wheels and motor bike controlls

is that not a daft law
Yeah crap innit!
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Old 20-06-2010, 10:40 PM
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would love to see the statistics for accidents on those vehicles seeing how many were involving drivers with no motorcycle usage over motorcycle trained riders
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