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Old 25-04-2016, 03:57 PM
HOS HOS is offline
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Default OBD2 scanners

Ive never needed such a thing before with any car that I've owned.
But this time I need an OBD scanner.
Its about diagnostics for problems on the car, bearing in mind we all know that there is no such thing as easy diagnostics.

So I bought a new ELM327 OBD2, V2.1 "Pro" blue tooth scanner with multiple software for whichever device you wish to use ie: laptop, iphone, android phone.
The softwear install on my phone was fine I just need to sit in the car, plug the scanner in and run through setting up blue tooth. Then scanning can be done.
I will let you know if its any good. Cost 6-00 on ebay.

Used a mates OBD scanner last week to find out what a couple of fault warning lights were. Both of them were down to a cable to a front wheel abs/speed sensor
being broken due to it being incorrecty fitted. Broke the electrical cable innit.
Fitted the new un meself I couldnt for the life of me see how anyone could have fitted it wrongly in the first place.
I had to use the old "doing it just by feel" skills because no way could I see wtf I was doing behind the hub.

Jobs a good un and fault lights out.
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Old 25-04-2016, 04:49 PM
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That's the problem with modern cars, too much shite!!!

My Land Rover diagnostic tool cost me over 300 but has saved me over double that in fault diagnosis charges etc.
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Old 25-04-2016, 07:59 PM
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When I worked for the AA we worked hard lobbying the EU to make the OBD sockets on vehicles accessable to outside organisations.

The manufacturers wanted to each make their own system and only allow their official dealers to have access. The standard sockets are the result of that work

Strangely some organisations tried to stop this claiming it would lead to Big Brother being able to spy on us, but that is what your smart phone is for.
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Old 25-04-2016, 08:12 PM
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Sore point in this house - hubby has a rather old Jag, it's back on the road now after the problem was finally diagnosed and a new relay fitted. I'm just waiting for the next problem now.........


Is your scanner vehicle specific HOS?
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Old 25-04-2016, 08:21 PM
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Originally Posted by BikerGran View Post
Sore point in this house - hubby has a rather old Jag, it's back on the road now after the problem was finally diagnosed and a new relay fitted. I'm just waiting for the next problem now.........


Is your scanner vehicle specific HOS?
No its a generic fit for most modern Jaguars.
But the car must be fitted with the OBD socket/facility.
If it is then it could be either OBD1 or OBD2 which have different plugs and software.
I would need to know how old and which model?

Last edited by HOS; 25-04-2016 at 08:59 PM.
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Old 25-04-2016, 08:30 PM
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When I had me moggie minor van the only thing that went wrong was the electric fuel pump. When the engine suddenly cut out it was fixed by stopping the car, leaping out and lifting the bonnet to gently smack the pump with a hammer or large spanner kept in the dash for this event.
Jumping back onto the car the engine then ran again for a few days.

I could see the writing on the wall back then for all this electrickery gubbins!!!

Last edited by HOS; 25-04-2016 at 09:05 PM.
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Old 25-04-2016, 08:54 PM
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Originally Posted by strima View Post
That's the problem with modern cars, too much shite!!!

My Land Rover diagnostic tool cost me over 300 but has saved me over double that in fault diagnosis charges etc.
I could not agree more !
I had a 2005 BMW 545 Se petrol V8 for a while and it only saw a set of spanners twice in the time I had it.
The rest of the disproportionate amount of time it was off the road, it was spent with the BMW IT specialist. Although I enjoyed trying out the entire BMW dealer demo and loan fleet, it got to the stage that BMW had my car more than I did. Thankfully it had a 5 year warranty and 5 year service contract from new.
There were electronics problems they could not fix, or would not fix seeing as BMW were paying for it

A great car in theory, but the numerous and frequent electrical faults made the car non-viable.... and to think I almost bought a TVR Cerbera 4.5 lightweight sport but decided against it for reasons of poor reliability.

Now you know why ebay is full of 6 or 7 year old top range BMW 5 and 7 series for chips money. Once they are out of warranty they are scrappers.
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Old 25-04-2016, 09:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HOS View Post
When I had me moggie minor van the only thing that went wrong was the electric fuel pump. When the engine suddenly cut out it was fixed by stopping the car, leaping out and lifting the bonnet to gently smack the pump with a hammer or large spanner kept in the dash for this event.
Jumping back onto the car the engine then ran again for a few days.

I could see the writing on the wall back them for all this electrickery gubbins!!!
All that ever went wrong with my old Transit diesel mk2 with the york motor ( no I don't live on a hill ) was the bloody electronic fuel cut off I just converted it to cable operation it never gave any trouble after that

Modern vehicle's are just a bloody headache and some not that modern, a fella I know has a old Peugeot 406 ( i think ) he's recently fitted injectors from a running car but his car won't run he won't believe me when i tell him they're coded to a particular engine and he will have to get the used injectors coded to match his car,the last i heard he was looking for a good used fuel pump
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Old 25-04-2016, 09:02 PM
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Originally Posted by harry View Post
When I worked for the AA we worked hard lobbying the EU to make the OBD sockets on vehicles accessable to outside organisations.

The manufacturers wanted to each make their own system and only allow their official dealers to have access. The standard sockets are the result of that work

Strangely some organisations tried to stop this claiming it would lead to Big Brother being able to spy on us, but that is what your smart phone is for.
The newer cars can monitor us via the ecu and gps.
A cars ecu can also be hacked into.
Its just unecessary for our lives, but obviously wanted for whatever their nefarious purposes.
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Old 25-04-2016, 09:05 PM
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Originally Posted by wiskers View Post
All that ever went wrong with my old Transit diesel mk2 with the york motor ( no I don't live on a hill ) was the bloody electronic fuel cut off I just converted it to cable operation it never gave any trouble after that

Modern vehicle's are just a bloody headache and some not that modern, a fella I know has a old Peugeot 406 ( i think ) he's recently fitted injectors from a running car but his car won't run he won't believe me when i tell him they're coded to a particular engine and he will have to get the used injectors coded to match his car,the last i heard he was looking for a good used fuel pump
Made me laugh ! But your spot on ! Even changing the bloody headlamp bulbs has become a dealer job on most cars.

I've enjoyed stripping and cleaning the carbs on the bike
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Old 25-04-2016, 09:18 PM
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Not so many years ago i'm sure that the bulbs on cars both front and rear had to be able to be changed by the average driver without tools when did that change I wonder
Another thing when did the law change on the side mounted indicators many new cars don't have them fitted now

A few years ago I gave serious thought about a frog eye sprite that i saw for sale the only problem was my garage is full of my trike and i didn't fancy having a soft top car living on the street in all weather's
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Old 25-04-2016, 09:24 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HOS View Post
The newer cars can monitor us via the ecu and gps.
A cars ecu can also be hacked into.
Its just unecessary for our lives, but obviously wanted for whatever their nefarious purposes.
Yup quite right. Some ECUs work like an aircraft black box, we can use them after serious accidents to tell if the driver was braking or had his foot to the floor. This evidence has been used when a truck ran into a queue of stationary traffic on a motroway.

But as far as I am aware its easier to get your position from a mobile phone. I'm told although its not my area of knowledge that traffic avoidance stuff for GPS is obtained from the speed at which mobile phones move along a road.
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Old 25-04-2016, 09:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HOS View Post
When I had me moggie minor van the only thing that went wrong was the electric fuel pump. When the engine suddenly cut out it was fixed by stopping the car, leaping out and lifting the bonnet to gently smack the pump with a hammer or large spanner kept in the dash for this event.
Jumping back onto the car the engine then ran again for a few days.

I could see the writing on the wall back then for all this electrickery gubbins!!!
I once opened the bonnet on a moggie and there was a hammer fastened to the bulkhead with a bolt through its handle and a piece of string went through a hole so the driver could bash the pump from the driver's seat. Barking mad.
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Old 25-04-2016, 09:36 PM
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A hammer was always a good fix for a sticky starter motor

My old A60 van had a dicky starter solenoid (spelin ) that i used to short with a hammer
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Old 25-04-2016, 09:51 PM
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A hammer was always a good fix for a sticky starter motor

My old A60 van had a dicky starter solenoid (spelin ) that i used to short with a hammer
Oh I loved whacking sticky starters. As soon as I had diagnised that to be the problem I would inform the driver that the starter motor was naughty and had to be punished. The look on their faces was highly entertaining.

Then when the car started once punishment had been delivered they looked upon me as some sort of magician. God I loved that job.
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Old 25-04-2016, 11:17 PM
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Flooding carb hit it with a hammer

The good old days when you could fix things when they broke
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Old 26-04-2016, 06:41 AM
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Flooding carb hit it with a hammer

The good old days when you could fix things when they broke
I shall give the ride on a good spanking then.....

I'll have a go at fixing the mower!
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Old 26-04-2016, 07:34 AM
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I shall give the ride on a good spanking then.....

I'll have a go at fixing the mower!
It's possible that the float needle has got itself hooked up, the float jet can develop a wear ridge as can the needle, a gentle tap with a hammer to the ridge at the top of the bowl can often dislodge the needle in the jet
The needle would often stick when the carb had been dry for some time

Modern petrol doesn't evaporate cleanly it leaves a horrible residue that can stick things together and block jets, it may well be worth stripping the carb and having a look

EDIT. I do think that Harry had the right idea the diaphragm on the fuel pump if I'm thinking correctly the fuel pump is lower than the carb, so if the diaphragm has gone it will flood the crankcase when parked up, you would only get a small amount of fuel into the sump through the carb.
On most bike's with a gravity fuel system a flooded crankcase would be down to a stuck or worn float needle or needle jet
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Last edited by wiskers; 26-04-2016 at 07:47 AM. Reason: See edit
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Old 26-04-2016, 01:06 PM
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If your bike is a modern machine it's handy to have one of those ELM OBD plugs stashed under the seat. The the plug for iPhone seem to be slightly more expensive than the android version. Apps for the phone are free unless you opt for the full versions but very handy indeed. Im still undecided whether to upgrade & buy the Ross tech VCDS setup for the VW especially as the dealer charges 90+ just to plug the laptop in
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Old 26-04-2016, 08:11 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HOS View Post
When I had me moggie minor van the only thing that went wrong was the electric fuel pump. When the engine suddenly cut out it was fixed by stopping the car, leaping out and lifting the bonnet to gently smack the pump with a hammer or large spanner kept in the dash for this event.
I nver had that with my Mog, only problem I had was the little SU carb, it would start overflowing and all I had to do was take it apart, clean it up, put it back - a ten minute job by the roadside!
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Old 26-04-2016, 09:01 PM
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I nver had that with my Mog, only problem I had was the little SU carb, it would start overflowing and all I had to do was take it apart, clean it up, put it back - a ten minute job by the roadside!
My van was great! Side exhaust and neighbours would ask me to deliver things for them or take things to the tip and paid me. I loved the sound of it.
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