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HOS 24-02-2018 09:00 PM

Petrol prices?
 
Local petrol prices round here are, heading back up towards their peek a few years ago. Locally U/L is averaging 1-30 a litre. That's for the basic stuff not the higher rating.
Its getting a bit steep again.

What's your local prices like?

strima 24-02-2018 11:20 PM

The same and it won't get any better as the government and greedy corporations want our money.

Friar Tuck 25-02-2018 07:03 AM

The oil price is steadying at around 65$ a barrel. This is due to the yanks gearing up their production and are now virtually self suficient in their usage. Trump..God bless him... had a littlet odo with this with his ramblings about making America Great Again or summat. Anyway this has made the Arabs think twice about cutting their production to increase demand to put up their cartel prices (greedy bastards) and so things have settled somewhat. If Prices are going up it's as Hos says the production companies are just being plain greedy as is the gummerment (they aren't exactly falling over themselves to cap the price increases!). By Rights the pump price should be hovering around the 1 a litre mark. Here in Bostongrad the price at the pump for Unleaded is about 117.99 (Why the 0.99?) and diesel 119.99 per litre.

This concludes the newsflash form the Ewokandtuck Newsdesk now over to our weather girl..Ewok...

Strider 25-02-2018 10:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Friar Tuck (Post 666738)
The oil price is steadying at around 65$ a barrel. This is due to the yanks gearing up their production and are now virtually self suficient in their usage. Trump..God bless him... had a littlet odo with this with his ramblings about making America Great Again or summat. Anyway this has made the Arabs think twice about cutting their production to increase demand to put up their cartel prices (greedy bastards) and so things have settled somewhat. If Prices are going up it's as Hos says the production companies are just being plain greedy as is the gummerment (they aren't exactly falling over themselves to cap the price increases!). By Rights the pump price should be hovering around the 1 a litre mark. Here in Bostongrad the price at the pump for Unleaded is about 117.99 (Why the 0.99?) and diesel 119.99 per litre.

This concludes the newsflash form the Ewokandtuck Newsdesk now over to our weather girl..Ewok...

Same prices round here, Manchester/Bury area. 0.99, so you think its 1.17 not 1.18

HOS 25-02-2018 01:01 PM

Trump is still a NWO tool. Same old.

HOS 25-02-2018 01:03 PM

I must find an app or a website for best local petrol prices. A free one that is.

Sir Ewok 25-02-2018 06:23 PM

Around 1.30 here and the Saudi's have got to make enough money so they can covertly fund Jihad in the west and ISIS.......:(

Strider 25-02-2018 07:11 PM

1.15.7 and 1.16.7 at the local Asda

HOS 25-02-2018 11:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sir Ewok (Post 666757)
Around 1.30 here and the Saudi's have got to make enough money so they can covertly fund Jihad in the west and ISIS.......:(

.... and so the Saudi's can buy illegal cluster bombs from the British government to maim and kill thousands of innocents in Yemen.

SS2 26-02-2018 12:42 PM

Hovers about a lot in Tyneside. Most of the garages around here seem to have cheap days and expensive days for some reason. UL I think is around 1.17.9 to 1.21.9, Diesel anywhere between 1.18.9 and 1.25.9. Shot up over the last six months.

Sir Ewok 26-02-2018 05:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HOS (Post 666772)
.... and so the Saudi's can buy illegal cluster bombs from the British government to maim and kill thousands of innocents in Yemen.

Yep! Dopey old Boris let the cat out of the bag on that score, though those in the know didn't need telling......:o

Remember, it keeps Immigrants to Britain in jobs, paying lots of lovely taxes to HRMC.......

Friar Tuck 27-02-2018 05:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SS2 (Post 666778)
Hovers about a lot in Tyneside. Most of the garages around here seem to have cheap days and expensive days for some reason. UL I think is around 1.17.9 to 1.21.9, Diesel anywhere between 1.18.9 and 1.25.9. Shot up over the last six months.

You'll find the "Cheap days" will occur around Special holiday times, like xmas and Easter. Usually one of the big supermarkets will drop their pump price by about 5p a litre to drag in the local prollateriate, and the others follow suit, but the pump price soon returns to normal after the holiday period!

Friar Tuck 27-02-2018 05:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sir Ewok (Post 666779)
Yep! Dopey old Boris let the cat out of the bag on that score, though those in the know didn't need telling......:o

Remember, it keeps Immigrants to Britain in jobs, paying lots of lovely taxes to HRMC.......

Don't you mean it "keeps the immigrants in Britain, and the HRMC gives them lots of subsidies to stay"?

Biker Buster 27-02-2018 09:31 AM

Fuelled up this morning at 1.17(.99) Last week it was 1.24

SS2 27-02-2018 12:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Friar Tuck (Post 666785)
You'll find the "Cheap days" will occur around Special holiday times, like xmas and Easter. Usually one of the big supermarkets will drop their pump price by about 5p a litre to drag in the local prollateriate, and the others follow suit, but the pump price soon returns to normal after the holiday period!

Nah they tend to have two or three days a week where fuel is discounted. The wife's on the ball and will go to a particular garage on that day and fill up. I just go when I need fuel and usually pay top whack.:rolleyes:

Biker Buster 27-02-2018 12:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sir Ewok (Post 666779)
Yep! Dopey old Boris let the cat out of the bag on that score, though those in the know didn't need telling......:o

Remember, it keeps Immigrants to Britain in jobs, paying lots of lovely taxes to HRMC.......

Ah but most of the EU immigrants are on low incomes paying little/no tax to the govt, whilst having me pay their benefits

Sir Ewok 27-02-2018 06:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Biker Buster (Post 666797)
Ah but most of the EU immigrants are on low incomes paying little/no tax to the govt, whilst having me pay their benefits

According to latest reports, Immigrants (at least EU ones) pay more tax than they take in Bennies. I am inclined to believe that because I used to work in one of the few engineering firms in Northampton and the Eastern Europeans moved in and started taking over all manner of jobs. One would get in and all of a sudden there were ten, then the accusations of 'Racism' started to push English workers out. As a Union Rep I had to help fight some of this shite, and it stopped after the laid false claims on one of the nicest guys we ever employed. There are many hard working Eastern Europeans in this country and when asked why they worked so many hours (before the EU working time directive) they said 'Back home we worked a standard 80 hour week, so 60 hours here is easy.' I think that unemployment could be reduced without EU immigrants but this country seems to be going the way of all Great Empires, destruction from enemies outside and collapse of will and morals inside. If people were made to work, and I know some people who are now in their 50's who have not done more than 5-6 years work since leaving school, then we wouldn't NEED immigrants to do this work. Many agencies took EU workers only because they got sick of Brits, not turning up, walking off the job or doing feck all while they were there.

Friar Tuck 28-02-2018 07:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Biker Buster (Post 666791)
Fuelled up this morning at 1.17(.99) Last week it was 1.24

That's because the oil price has dropped recently...

Friar Tuck 28-02-2018 07:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SS2 (Post 666796)
Nah they tend to have two or three days a week where fuel is discounted. The wife's on the ball and will go to a particular garage on that day and fill up. I just go when I need fuel and usually pay top whack.:rolleyes:

I end up using the local Tescos, only because the missus nags me to use the sainsbury credit card and get the nectar points which she saves up for xmas, and also get the trsco points wgich she uses when the points come thruogh on a monthly basis!!!!!!

The only thing I get out of all this is a Bottle of Tullemore Dew on me birthday!

Sir Ewok 28-02-2018 05:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Friar Tuck (Post 666806)
I end up using the local Tescos, only because the missus nags me to use the sainsbury credit card and get the nectar points which she saves up for xmas, and also get the trsco points wgich she uses when the points come thruogh on a monthly basis!!!!!!

The only thing I get out of all this is a Bottle of Tullemore Dew on me birthday!

Better than a tight'n'more Jew......:o

HOS 01-03-2018 06:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sir Ewok (Post 666779)
Yep! Dopey old Boris let the cat out of the bag on that score, though those in the know didn't need telling......:o

Remember, it keeps Immigrants to Britain in jobs, paying lots of lovely taxes to HRMC.......

Lots of tax on less than the minimum wage for long hours every day. Or just 10 a week what the gangmasters pay. Like the plethora of local car washes.

Boris is far too much of a twat to be an MP never mind a cabinet member.

Sir Ewok 01-03-2018 06:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HOS (Post 666835)
Lots of tax on less than the minimum wage for long hours every day. Or just 10 a week what the gangmasters pay. Like the plethora of local car washes.

Boris is far too much of a twat to be an MP never mind a cabinet member.

Definitely agree about Boris. most of those that fall prey to gangmasters are illegals who will come regardless of our position in the EU. Many Chinese, Indian, Afghans etc. come here because they know that once they destroy any passport their is no chance of sending them home. Perhaps an offshore island off the coast of Scotland could be used as a holding camp until they decide to name their home country, although I believe you can now work that out from subatomic lead particles deposited within teeth, so maybe another way to go. Most car washes get raided on a regular basis but unless they do smething about the illegals..ie. deport or jail them, then they will keep coming back.

I worked for a company where a British guy was sent for a job. The foreman said "Wait by the time clock and I will get you a clock card." Because he took more than a couple of minutes the guy started to leave and when asked why, he replied " I ain't gonna get fucked around like this!!" Obviously not worker material, and I have seen this happen a lot, usually after a few hours or half a day. Firms get fed up with turnover of staff as it costs too much money and disruption.....

HOS 02-03-2018 06:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sir Ewok (Post 666837)
Definitely agree about Boris. most of those that fall prey to gangmasters are illegals who will come regardless of our position in the EU. Many Chinese, Indian, Afghans etc. come here because they know that once they destroy any passport their is no chance of sending them home. Perhaps an offshore island off the coast of Scotland could be used as a holding camp until they decide to name their home country, although I believe you can now work that out from subatomic lead particles deposited within teeth, so maybe another way to go. Most car washes get raided on a regular basis but unless they do smething about the illegals..ie. deport or jail them, then they will keep coming back.

I worked for a company where a British guy was sent for a job. The foreman said "Wait by the time clock and I will get you a clock card." Because he took more than a couple of minutes the guy started to leave and when asked why, he replied " I ain't gonna get fucked around like this!!" Obviously not worker material, and I have seen this happen a lot, usually after a few hours or half a day. Firms get fed up with turnover of staff as it costs too much money and disruption.....

I'm sorrry but I don't agree with knocking British workers and praising immigrant Labour. Jamie Oliver the wanker did the same and now his restaurant business is folding. He can't even make money using cheap labour who are oh so reliable compared to British workers. Oliver won't go bust though he has 150 million pounds of property.

There are companies who gladly use immigrant labour because they are so desperate for minimum wage work they are happy to ignore UK employment laws designed to protect workers rights. Those rights took a long time over many decades to become law, now those laws are put aside in the name of cheap Labour. British workers are 100% right to refuse those kind of jobs. Company bosses don't give a fuck as long as they can chose bigger yaghts and better holiday homes. Around here it's East Europeans who are exploited by companies. No proper jobs here just minimum wage slave labour for very long hours and no holidays.

The numerous 5 car washes here are all East Europeans and they work outside in all weathers. These are your 10 a week jobs and a roof over their heads in a multi occupancy house full of beds.
The new slave labour market.

Sir Ewok 02-03-2018 06:41 PM

You are right to a point, but I have seen what British workers do, having been forced to do agency work to feed my family. I know people who haven't worked for over 15 years (and not through ill health). But of course it depends on how you define 'British'. Many west Indians came here in the 50's and 60's working poorly paid jobs (no minimum wage then) or the jobs that nobody wanted, but now most would want the same as 'white' kids and the same would eventually happen with Eastern Europeans. I worked in a place that originally employed over 400 people on 3 shifts but the workforce was so unreliable that a lot of the originals have gone. One example was that we got paid on a Thursday, but a local nightclub used to do a student night on Thursdays and so a good quarter of ther back shift would be off sick on Thursdays and it only came to an end when the club shut down. On one occasion a manager went for a night out and met most of the 'sick' in that club (being management, he hadn't a clue what was going on). People would sleep in the toilets or get mates to clock them in and not turn up at all. I have worked in Many, Many factories and see this all over. I am not saying that illegals don't exist or that some companies prefer 'Minimum wage' fodder and I also make you right that decent people should refuse some jobs that take the piss. I was taught a work ethic, which I passed on to my sons, unfortunately in some families this has not happened, whether it was because parents don't want to hassle or pressurise their kids or because they don't care. While a cheap workforce does exist and people on benefits are being vilified in the press what chance do we actually stand?

HOS 02-03-2018 09:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sir Ewok (Post 666848)
You are right to a point, but I have seen what British workers do, having been forced to do agency work to feed my family. I know people who haven't worked for over 15 years (and not through ill health). But of course it depends on how you define 'British'. Many west Indians came here in the 50's and 60's working poorly paid jobs (no minimum wage then) or the jobs that nobody wanted, but now most would want the same as 'white' kids and the same would eventually happen with Eastern Europeans. I worked in a place that originally employed over 400 people on 3 shifts but the workforce was so unreliable that a lot of the originals have gone. One example was that we got paid on a Thursday, but a local nightclub used to do a student night on Thursdays and so a good quarter of ther back shift would be off sick on Thursdays and it only came to an end when the club shut down. On one occasion a manager went for a night out and met most of the 'sick' in that club (being management, he hadn't a clue what was going on). People would sleep in the toilets or get mates to clock them in and not turn up at all. I have worked in Many, Many factories and see this all over. I am not saying that illegals don't exist or that some companies prefer 'Minimum wage' fodder and I also make you right that decent people should refuse some jobs that take the piss. I was taught a work ethic, which I passed on to my sons, unfortunately in some families this has not happened, whether it was because parents don't want to hassle or pressurise their kids or because they don't care. While a cheap workforce does exist and people on benefits are being vilified in the press what chance do we actually stand?

I hear what you say and have heard about the workers who are permanently on the skive or pulling sickies. The issues around work are jobs are complex.
I am of the same school as you being a grafter and working for what I had.
There are people who think they go to work to do as little as possible and expect others to carry them. To some degree and more so in smaller companies every worker is a key part of the profitability of the company, but a lot of people don't get that.
I've said to my kids and to my partners son, if you can be reliable and work bloody hard and be conscientious and not take time of sick unless absolutely necessary, then you stand a far better chance of getting a job and keeping jobs.
During the early 1990s economic slump I fell from a great height and ended up in a tiny 2 bed house by good luck and scratting around for factory jobs, usually the type of jobs other people couldn't do or wouldn't do, I took them. I was doing agency work for maybe 3 or 4 years with no work inbetween. Just keeping the home together. After about 6 weeks of me not having any temporary work we faced going bust again, but luck always chimed in with some work just when we needed it. Could be 3 days work or 1 week or 2 weeks, I took it. Picking and packing, shop work, commercial kitchens work, powder coating, electronics plant, delivery driver, taxi driver, and many more.
But I never came across any skivers, if you were not working fast they would ask you not to come back the next day.
But I learned a hell, of a lot in that time, especially about me and what i am capable of and to keep the family together and in housing.

But the work place has changed I am aware of that. My daughter was for a short while an assistant branch manager at a well known staffing agency. She felt that not only did workers not have realistic expectations of the kind of jobs available to them, but also the employers were equally unrealistic about the kind of candidates who were available for their low paid dead end jobs.

However Uni graduates are equally clueless and sloth when it comes to career jobs. Its not an education thing, its a cultural thing. The ones who work very hard and are prepared to learn as they go, they are the ones who progress and take better jobs. I've had young grads work for me who I wouldn't trust to put the refuse bins out never mind complete a simple task schedule.
I worked for most of my life in a white male dominated profession so I have been influenced by that to a degree. But I used to have a go at anything work wise.

Friar Tuck 03-03-2018 05:27 AM

Still a bout 117.99/ltr = Petrol. 119.99/ltr = Diesel.....Around Bostonski...

Sir Ewok 03-03-2018 05:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HOS (Post 666852)
I hear what you say and have heard about the workers who are permanently on the skive or pulling sickies. The issues around work are jobs are complex.
I am of the same school as you being a grafter and working for what I had.
There are people who think they go to work to do as little as possible and expect others to carry them. To some degree and more so in smaller companies every worker is a key part of the profitability of the company, but a lot of people don't get that.
I've said to my kids and to my partners son, if you can be reliable and work bloody hard and be conscientious and not take time of sick unless absolutely necessary, then you stand a far better chance of getting a job and keeping jobs.
During the early 1990s economic slump I fell from a great height and ended up in a tiny 2 bed house by good luck and scratting around for factory jobs, usually the type of jobs other people couldn't do or wouldn't do, I took them. I was doing agency work for maybe 3 or 4 years with no work inbetween. Just keeping the home together. After about 6 weeks of me not having any temporary work we faced going bust again, but luck always chimed in with some work just when we needed it. Could be 3 days work or 1 week or 2 weeks, I took it. Picking and packing, shop work, commercial kitchens work, powder coating, electronics plant, delivery driver, taxi driver, and many more.
But I never came across any skivers, if you were not working fast they would ask you not to come back the next day.
But I learned a hell, of a lot in that time, especially about me and what i am capable of and to keep the family together and in housing.

But the work place has changed I am aware of that. My daughter was for a short while an assistant branch manager at a well known staffing agency. She felt that not only did workers not have realistic expectations of the kind of jobs available to them, but also the employers were equally unrealistic about the kind of candidates who were available for their low paid dead end jobs.

However Uni graduates are equally clueless and sloth when it comes to career jobs. Its not an education thing, its a cultural thing. The ones who work very hard and are prepared to learn as they go, they are the ones who progress and take better jobs. I've had young grads work for me who I wouldn't trust to put the refuse bins out never mind complete a simple task schedule.
I worked for most of my life in a white male dominated profession so I have been influenced by that to a degree. But I used to have a go at anything work wise.

I think you have eloquently put most of what I was trying to say. Everybody has a different work experience, even within the same company. Like Friars childhood, mine was 180 degrees different, with two loving parents and a Dad that was more like a big brother, whom I love beyond the day he passed. I ended my working career doing almost anything, including toilet cleaning to keep my family fed, at one point I was doing 3 full time jobs (picking/packing in a wool warehouse (Sirdar), security guard at Diversy and night shelf stacking at Tesco). The last 19 years was at KAB seating where I became a welder/tester/assessor and later a Group Leader (Foreman) in the stores, following my cancer op. I have worked on the bins and drain cleaning as a temp and I liked it, getting dirty was never a problem when it came to work.....:o

HOS 03-03-2018 07:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sir Ewok (Post 666860)
I think you have eloquently put most of what I was trying to say. Everybody has a different work experience, even within the same company. Like Friars childhood, mine was 180 degrees different, with two loving parents and a Dad that was more like a big brother, whom I love beyond the day he passed. I ended my working career doing almost anything, including toilet cleaning to keep my family fed, at one point I was doing 3 full time jobs (picking/packing in a wool warehouse (Sirdar), security guard at Diversy and night shelf stacking at Tesco). The last 19 years was at KAB seating where I became a welder/tester/assessor and later a Group Leader (Foreman) in the stores, following my cancer op. I have worked on the bins and drain cleaning as a temp and I liked it, getting dirty was never a problem when it came to work.....:o

My mate big John and I were the only two guys in the whole factory who could operate the flow solder machine. It was for soldering PCB's on a continuous conveyor belt. You load the trays in one end with PCB's and loose components and offloaded them at the other end of the machine. We placed the PCB's on a tray which carried 4 x 8" square PCB's. Then removed the trays and brought them back to reuse. We had to maintain the solder bath and chuck huge bars of solder in now and then. The open solder bath you stand by and constantly move around was 300 degC. There was also a foaming flux bath which was like a wave for the PCB's lot pass over. Let's just say it was fucking hot work and much more so in summer. We separately put easily 1500 PCB's through on a 10 hour shift.
John was 6' 9" tall with one gold tooth and did the doors in his spare time. He was a martial artist and loved his drum and bass.
So we operated that machine between us for maybe 2 years. The managers tried to train up other people to share the work with us because it was so hard. We showed other guys and trained them well. But once they were given their first shift they folded. They couldn't do it. One guy was a black belt in proper ju-jitsu with the Japanese flag on the wall of the dojo. He got trained but flaked after one shift. So John and me became a bit of an elite team and we had a good laugh. The factory was 90% women so respect was due to the ladies.

I think that job is one of the reasons my lungs are bad. Inhaling all that shite every day.

Friar Tuck 04-03-2018 07:02 AM

Ah, flow soldering machines....where the flux and solder actually flows uphill...so to speak!....

HOS 04-03-2018 09:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Friar Tuck (Post 666868)
Ah, flow soldering machines....where the flux and solder actually flows uphill...so to speak!....

Yeah the solder was pumped into a wave form so the pcb's just skimmed the top of the wave with their underside. The flux was pumped with air to make it foam and it too had to be set and regularly adjusted to make sure the wave height was spot on or parts of the circuit boards didn't get any solder or any flux causing the same no solder in patches.

I used to have a cheap Tandy personal radio with ear pieces to listen to radio and stop me going terminally insane with the repetitive nature of the work.
For two weeks the flow solder machine was having engineer maintenance so they put me on a section where the pre-soldered boards had to be dipped in liquid varnish to water proof them. So I spent 2 weeks sticking 4 pieces of yellow tape, one on each corner of the boards top mask off the fixing holes.
That drove me fucking nuts! my brain was turning into cheap vegetable soup by the day.
In the end I quit because I was bored shitless and wanted something better.
I hated the aged British management demarcation of "them and us".
Office staff and factory floor staff.
Some of the management were real talentless wankers.

Sir Ewok 04-03-2018 12:36 PM

I know what you mean about management, though sometimes the 'them and us' came from the shop floor as well. At Cosworth's the company had been started by two guys in a back street garage tuning crossflow engines. The company had got too big for them and so management were employed. Unfortunately most of them seemed to be rejects from other industries including one guy who had worked for a tyre fitting firm that folded, I wondered why? The management plan to make you do what they wanted was to shout very loudly in your face until you ether did as you were told (not always the correct thing though) or you left. I stood up to those wankers and made one lock himself in his office because nobody had stood up to his bullying before and he didn't know how to handle it. I was so disappointed with the management I started to do a management course at college paid for by myself. But the kind of crap you talked about was what they were actually teaching! One scenario was that you have come across two guys fighting on the premises, what do you do? My answer was interview both men, find out why and discipline as necessary ie. the one who caused the fight. However the correct answer was...... sack both for gross misconduct. which seemed to be the answer to almost any scenario....

HOS 04-03-2018 04:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sir Ewok (Post 666878)
I know what you mean about management, though sometimes the 'them and us' came from the shop floor as well. At Cosworth's the company had been started by two guys in a back street garage tuning crossflow engines. The company had got too big for them and so management were employed. Unfortunately most of them seemed to be rejects from other industries including one guy who had worked for a tyre fitting firm that folded, I wondered why? The management plan to make you do what they wanted was to shout very loudly in your face until you ether did as you were told (not always the correct thing though) or you left. I stood up to those wankers and made one lock himself in his office because nobody had stood up to his bullying before and he didn't know how to handle it. I was so disappointed with the management I started to do a management course at college paid for by myself. But the kind of crap you talked about was what they were actually teaching! One scenario was that you have come across two guys fighting on the premises, what do you do? My answer was interview both men, find out why and discipline as necessary ie. the one who caused the fight. However the correct answer was...... sack both for gross misconduct. which seemed to be the answer to almost any scenario....

Most people assume their position. There are very few who don't fit the mould, or any mould,s, what mould's? :)

You reminded me of when I kicked off badly at a manager at one of the housing companies I was on contract too. I should have been fully rehabilitated tbh, but never was. I didn't know I had ptsd at the time.
Tbh no one would employ me now or want to.
All I remember was him cornered in an office within the general office area and I was between him and the only door. I kicked off with him verbally about summat I couldn't even tell you the day after. I remember him shaking, I assume with fear as I walked out. I still cant remember what is was about or why or what I said.
I had a phone call at 10pm that night by the agency who said the company boss had called them and he respected that I had some major injuries, seeing as I was on two elbow crutches, but they said they did not want me going back after what had happened. I really knew then that I was not fit to work.

Sir Ewok 04-03-2018 08:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HOS (Post 666885)
Most people assume their position. There are very few who don't fit the mould, or any mould,s, what mould's? :)

You reminded me of when I kicked off badly at a manager at one of the housing companies I was on contract too. I should have been fully rehabilitated tbh, but never was. I didn't know I had ptsd at the time.
Tbh no one would employ me now or want to.
All I remember was him cornered in an office within the general office area and I was between him and the only door. I kicked off with him verbally about summat I couldn't even tell you the day after. I remember him shaking, I assume with fear as I walked out. I still cant remember what is was about or why or what I said.
I had a phone call at 10pm that night by the agency who said the company boss had called them and he respected that I had some major injuries, seeing as I was on two elbow crutches, but they said they did not want me going back after what had happened. I really knew then that I was not fit to work.

It's always hard to find that we are not indestructible after all and that whatever injuries we have will or do limit our abilities to do what we have always done in the past. Sometimes we can alter course and make the most of whatever we have, but PTSD and severe mental/physical problems are generally things you can't work around. Having had borderline PTSD, never treated, I know that it can be a hard coming back even from the borderline. I have always fought for the underdog, usually workmates or friends/family which explains my Union roots. Coming from a working class family I guess that I did better than some, though not as good as others. I calmed down later in life and I always realised that GOOD management allied to a GOOD workforce made for a productive and profitable company, which was a good for everybody. I had a good reputation with most of the workers and management because I didn't run to them with every trivial complaint, trying to work things out before they spiralled out of control. But, of course, you can't please all the people all the time.

A guy came to me with a serious complaint regrading confidential information about his family which had been spread by another worker. His son was mentally ill and the guy, who he didn't get on with was taking the piss after reading files that had been left exposed on a managers desk. The first we always asked was "What do you hope to obtain from this complaint?" that is, do you want an apology or do you want to go through the complaints system or even tribunal, if necessary. He said he would be happy to accept an apology from the manager and the guy spreading the information. I spoke to the guy and he apologised, in writing, and verbally. The manager was reluctant to apologise but he was finally persuaded to do so. The aggrieved person then went away stating he was happy with the outcome and the complaint was closed. Two weeks later I was a wanker for not getting them sacked....Doh!

HOS 04-03-2018 10:32 PM

The brain injury is difficult.
Personality change is part of that. You don't know who you are anymore. I don't know how I will react to any situation. So that's why generally I shun people and stay away for both sake. I don't want to inflict me on anyone.
Its much much easier to talk online because I can take time to consider answers or just not answer.

The psychological tests at the neurology unit found that while my speech and communications centres were still working OK, the rest of it isn't too great.
I scored 97th percentile for spoken words, but that was an isolated scorer the rest were low or poor. My lowest score was 32nd percentile. So there is vast disparity between different brain functions and this is what causes issues.
Due to oxygen starvation I lost a lot of IQ, parts of my brain died.
I was very lucky to be accepted into Headway who are 100% brilliant people by the way!.
They are the UK brain injury specialists for rehab and support.
I met some incredible people there who are support workers and service users. I learned a lot about brain injury and that was very helpful to me.

There I was 10 days after 9/11 on my fairly new Hayabusa, had a good career, good salary and planning my next career move to earn more and work less.
But somewhere along that road was a car that would impact me in such a way that my life would never be the same again. I knew a lot of people socially and professionally, but I never realised how far and wide the collateral damage from that split second encounter would reach and its ongoing. You think you have it all sussed and making your way in life and then bang !
Suddenly everything changes and you don't even see it coming.
But life changes, nothing ever stays the same and its important to learn that.
Now I am not whinging about this, I'm dead calm talking about it. :) and I still ride.

All those old biker sayings that I used to think were so cheesy, suddenly come into perspective.
Bikers for life.
Live to ride, ride to live.
and many more.

Friar Tuck 05-03-2018 08:09 AM

I used to work for a company in Oxford that made medical equipment...not hard to work out who they were really, without naming them! They closed their Abingdon plant down and I said that I'd commute for 6 months to their Old Woking plant whilst they transferred production of their new Table Top Babyt heart monitor machine. I was on the New Product Project Team for the out sourcing of the purchasing requirements to mak it. So having to make a two hour commute each way every day, it can get a tad stressful. Then you do a days work dealing with ..how can we say? Um Basically uni grad arseholes masquerading as trained production managers (female - not that I have anything against them ,just that their way of thinking isnt logical for the position, nor ar they tactful when trying to either motivate or talk to the workforce). The worst thing is their attitude to work collegues when things go wrong! If it goes wrong it is best to sort out the problem first then diagnose what went wrong andd then put processes inplace to ensure that they don't happen again. That wasy everyone is happy and everone learns without pointing fingers and blaming who was responsible. However there is a thing called "Modern Management Techniques" Which seems to get in the way and is taught b mindless wombats that masquerade an "Management Consultants" and teach courses that senior Management spend loads of unnecessary company cash on for their staff to "attend" This is where PC indoctrination is introduced and for these training companies to justify their existence! This is prevalent in HR depts! Use to be called "Personnel" but now "HR" - ffs! Anyway back to Oxford Instrument Medical...oops mentioned them... They've gone anyway.. bought out by another company I believe and production moved to Wales! There was a female "production" manager that had been well and trully indoctrinated in to these management tecniques, one of which is called "the 5 Whys"! this where one asks the same question five times and by the fifth time the root cause of the problem is unearthed and then can be "addressed" so to speak. So ther I was, had a shit journey into work having used the bike (A had a Honda GB500TT at that time nice but slooow, used to back fire on the overrun when shutting the throttle off quickly. Great fun when you know how to use it, but could kill your electrics though if used too often!) so by the time mid morning arrived I was ready to rip anyones head off, not helped by having to source shit components from China against my recommendations, and then having to resource locally as the stuff had turned up late and way out of Quality and tolerance. So along comes thind blonde bimbo and sticks her face into my personal space (I hate people who stand to close - always have done - it's confrontational immediately without reason) and in front of the whole office continues to ask me why the delay? So I say late delivery from Chinaa and bad quality necessitating in the resource and new and correct items will be with us within 24 hours! not bad considering I only knew about this at a 8.00am that moring as I got in after a two hour shit ride in. So then she proceeds to ask ne another four times why was this? After answering exactly the same way three times, she got both barrels and at the same time I Physiacally lifted her off her feet and placed her about 3 feet away from my face at arms length and bawled at her as to what part of the english languauge did she not understand and do not stand within two feet of me in a confrontational manner and ask impertinent questions that halready had been addressed and corrected before she had even been made aware of any issues that did not concern her! I think her complete comuppance was total when the whole of the office which had gone quiet (apparently this woman had the ear of the directors (screwing one of them) and the office erruptedin to appluad! and clapping! She Stormed out, I was absolutely fuming! Little did she know that I had the ear of the Ops director as he was ex Abingdon like me and so when she went to complain he said to her to that I was absolutley correct in my actions (even thought he ticked me off for physically moving her)! And that she should wind her neck in when dealing with factory staff, and Middle management! of which although I was only a buyer I was considered "middle management"....

Sir Ewok 05-03-2018 06:05 PM

HOS, the most important biker saying is.... 'Keep it shiny side up', which it seems we all ignore (at our peril) from time to time. As for your IQ dropping, I read your posts and see a measured and examined reply. OK, spelling may go awry, as does mine, usually due to 'Fat Finger' syndrome or simply typing too fast for the brain to keep up. If what you write is a reflection of IQ then yours must have been in the higher bracket to start with. Not bigging you up, just stating a fact, as I see it.

For some reason, back a couple of decades ago, this country decided it didn't need apprenticeships (a situation I am glad to see has been reversed) and we lost the opportunity to train youngsters to do the technical jobs. Plumbers/Electricians/Builders from Poland and other Eastern European countries flooded Britain and took over. At KAB Seating we always had an apprentice in the maintenance dept. and they got into the NVQ system of which I was one of the first volunteers to learn welding. I went on to do the trainer/assessor components afterwards. This country used to be an industrial powerhouse, producing everything from Nails to aircraft. Today it is mostly leisure industry or Warehousing and even in places like Birmingham you are hard pressed to find and engineering or production work.

Strider 05-03-2018 08:29 PM

Six sigma, business process engineering, 8D, lean manufacturing, lean six sigma, DAIMC, GEMBA walks, Continuous Improvement blah blah

Errrrr NO!! its called good management where all of the above are just new fads. I can do the stuff and use the bullshit words as it seems they don't understand it if I don't DOH!!.

If you communicate and simply talk with the workforce at all levels in a respectful manner, all of the above can be achieved in whatever "format" you want to call it.

Friar Tuck 06-03-2018 06:15 AM

I never did an an apprenticedship. All the mechanica skills I got was from watching and helping as a kid Dad when he used to run his own garage business. I say "dad" as he was really my Uncle. My real Dad was in the RAF and when mym died when I was Two Dad couldn't leave the RAF as He'd sign up for the full term, so my brother and sister were packed off to boarding school, paid for the the MOD, as all foreign posting personnel were entitled to. and me being only two at the time got looked after by my Aunt and Uncle. However when I was 7 I got packed off to boarding school as well! Hated every minute of it. When I left in 1975 (Dad had come out of the RAF, so funding got stopped..hooray!) I left and went to live with Aunt and Uncle (Who I called Mum and DAD!) and Uncle had now stopped his garage business and had become a driver. So me joining him in thr business didn't happen. So I ended up first becoming a trainee Baker, then joined a local Engineering Merchants as a Trainee warehouse assistant, where I learnt all about the supplying of nuts, bolts, washers, and all engineering components etc. From there I went into the buying game for engineering components etc ,learning my "trade" as I progressed up the greasy pole of "management" learing how to reas drawings etc, from working within the manufacturing industry! Sadly most of the wel known and household names that I worked for have now gone tits up or merged and disappeared over time! Names like Roneo Vickers, Gestetner Manufacturing, Oxford Instruments, etc. The only real manufacturing company that I worked for and is still going is Cosworth Engineering and that has been bought and sold on, on a number of occassions.

HOS 07-03-2018 09:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sir Ewok (Post 666903)
HOS, the most important biker saying is.... 'Keep it shiny side up', which it seems we all ignore (at our peril) from time to time. As for your IQ dropping, I read your posts and see a measured and examined reply. OK, spelling may go awry, as does mine, usually due to 'Fat Finger' syndrome or simply typing too fast for the brain to keep up. If what you write is a reflection of IQ then yours must have been in the higher bracket to start with. Not bigging you up, just stating a fact, as I see it.

For some reason, back a couple of decades ago, this country decided it didn't need apprenticeships (a situation I am glad to see has been reversed) and we lost the opportunity to train youngsters to do the technical jobs. Plumbers/Electricians/Builders from Poland and other Eastern European countries flooded Britain and took over. At KAB Seating we always had an apprentice in the maintenance dept. and they got into the NVQ system of which I was one of the first volunteers to learn welding. I went on to do the trainer/assessor components afterwards. This country used to be an industrial powerhouse, producing everything from Nails to aircraft. Today it is mostly leisure industry or Warehousing and even in places like Birmingham you are hard pressed to find and engineering or production work.

That confirms what I said about being able to communicate by written words rather than verbally. One of the beauties of an ABI is how you go "off" very quickly, its like falling off a cliff face. On the occassions when I get very tired and I've hit the wall with pain and I'm hungry that's when I get very out of hand. Its not cool.

I started out as a trainee with one of the top 5 design and build companies in the UK. I did technical college and worked my spuds off to progress on the career ladder. By the age of 21 I was running three multi million pound building contracts in NW England and I had earned my first professional institute membership and served on regional committee for that institute. I didn't see that I had any limits at the time and I was going for it. But the construction industry changed big style inn the 1980s and 90s. It became dog eat dog and there was no loyalty either way. That was when I went freelance/contract because there was so much shit and politics in the offices I worked that I didn't want to be a part of. My view was and still is, you are there to do a job. End of.
But that the beauty of being freelance because you are employed to get the job done and fuck the politics. That's why freelancers are mercenary in their approach to getting the job done. That's why they take you on. You develop a very high level of skill over the years which is borderline 6th sense about the job and people. But its all based on learning as you climb the career ladder.
Not some 20 something nob who's got a degree and thinks they already arrived.
I earned more on hourly rate than any architect or engineer I worked with. I wasn't unique in that either, there was a band of us. All very highly skilled technicians/technologists. Through hard practical experience not because of a mickey mouse general degree qualification on a piece of paper.

But I got taken down hard in 2001 and for me that was it, career over.
Shit happens as we know. ;) Its how you deal with it that matters.
Life changes and nothing stays the same. A fundamental fact we lose sight of at times in our lives.

Sir Ewok 07-03-2018 06:28 PM

I started with a gas fitting apprenticeship when I was 15 with the South Eastern Gas Board. I failed the apprenticeship due to the 3 B's... Bikes, Birds and Booze. At that age, all my mates were earning 4-5 times what I earned just labouring, but I did want more, just couldn't see it as an apprentice. When I was 17 I got my 15 year old girlfriend pregnant (we both lost our virginity together) and she later became my wife. At 21 I was already married with my eldest son arriving earlier in the year, the bike had to go, but before that I bought a Reliant. Working on the Brakes one Sunday morning, I needed a slave (can't call it that now) cylinder, so jumping on the bike I shot off to Stockwell, South London, where a bike and car spares shop would be open. I only got as far as the bend in the road about 400 yds, when a car turned across my path and I went over the top. I worked for the Gas Board as an Apprentice/ Maintenance fitter for 6 years and then we moved to Northampton. I worked in lots of jobs, Timken as a bearing grinder, Trondex as a Tool fitter, even the post Office at one point, just to keep working. I had gained lots of experience working on bikes and various jobs around the house and when then opportunity came I jumped into contract fitting. Because I was an unknown, I had to build a rep from scratch, as you are only as good as your last job. The first 'decent' job I had was at Watney's North London refurbishing pump seals and refitting them (the last crew had walked off the job, leaving them all stripped down and in one pile, which was not good as the pumps were all slightly different). We got on the job and the Boss says "You have done pumps before?" We had blagged the job and we said "No, but we need the work." Boss was great, he showed us how everything went together and we only had two failures 1. where they had tried a different seal. 2. where the had machined the bearing housing out to beyond normal spec in order to fit a cheaper seal. I went to Nigeria for 6 months with this firm (coca-cola) and was asked to do Baghdad Airport, which I turned down. Helped build the conveyor system for Heathrow's new terminal, Worked in most breweries, bottling plants and car plants in the UK, even the Co-oP cheese plant in Loch Maben where we lodged in Lockerbie. I eventually worked for myself(Can't get a better or worse Boss) with 8 people working for me on a need to finish the job basis. We did ghosters, weekenders, and all sorts to get the job done, especially job and knock (finish) where I managed to earn 110 hours money in 6 days. The end of the contract engineering came when competitors staring using guys that were signing on, I was charging 4 an hour and paying most of that to my guys and they were paying dolies 2.50 an hour, I couldn't compete and stay legal. The final nail came with my divorce, by then I was buying and selling precious metals (mainly silver from film) and they came up with silverless film and later computer imaging, so I ended up working for KAB in my final years. Not bad for a chancer who had no qualifications until I worked for KAB. Graft is one way to go but somebody said to me... The more you sweat at work, the less you get paid. It took a while to realise that he meant, learn your job and it becomes easy, Digging holes does not pay in the long run......


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