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-   -   Rebuilding it. (http://www.100-biker.com/forums/showthread.php?t=51337)

HOS 04-06-2016 06:33 PM

Rebuilding it.
 
8 spark plugs, twin cradle overhead frame, masses of vacuum lines, fuel lines, lectrics, throttle abd choke cables, Ahh the joy of a Kawasaki top end.
Carbs back on next. Got my rubber lube ready ;)

Friar Tuck 05-06-2016 07:04 AM

Oooer Missus....

HOS 05-06-2016 08:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Friar Tuck (Post 660412)
Oooer Missus....

Old carb to head inlet rubbers :o
I will be sat on the bike with a large piece of wood cable tied to the back of
the carbs to get some leverage. I may even apply some heat with a heat gun to the rubbers just to get a little bit of pliability into them before I start pushing.
Carbs are fully sorted and with a hybrid stage-1 Dynojet kit fitted.
Then I've got some custom made to my spec PiperX individual air filters.
Taking my time, no point in rushing.

SS2 05-06-2016 09:13 PM

Bit of wood like you say and ratchet strap them into place.

HOS 05-06-2016 09:47 PM

Here they are all shiney shiney and rebuilt.
I bought a set of bike specific stainless allen bolts for the carbs.
8 off an eBay seller in France.
Seeing as the carb screws are made of chocolate :D

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y8/...ps19kwbdgq.jpg

I will use the standard setting for the mixture screws but I may buy a Colortune to get it spot on. Failing that there's dyno unit about 15 miles away.

HOS 05-06-2016 09:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SS2 (Post 660431)
Bit of wood like you say and ratchet strap them into place.

Good idea, it may come to that.

HOS 05-06-2016 09:48 PM

This is a mates ZR1100 fully rebuilt from the ground up.
It wasnt that colour to start with.

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y8/...ps1uvcdpwc.jpg

HOS 05-06-2016 09:52 PM

This is some of the Dynojet kit.
You need bloody good eyes and not huge hands like mine to do this.
But I did it in the end. The coin is a 5p so you can see how small the parts are.

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y8/...pswokz3vgi.jpg

Friar Tuck 06-06-2016 05:44 AM

My carb manifold rubbers need replacing as they are starting to crack with age. I dread having to take them off. if replacing the downpipes was anything to go by. Removing Japanese fasteners that have been insitu for 15 years is not a prospect I am looking forward to!

Biker Buster 06-06-2016 12:07 PM

You could always smear black mastic over the rubbers, and delay the inevitable, as you'll be too busy rebuilding walls/stars and a roof to spend serious time on your bike..

Friar Tuck 07-06-2016 06:44 AM

Good thinking Batman!....

Friar Tuck 07-06-2016 06:45 AM

Erm, how do I get to the middle ones without removing half of the bike to get to them?

HOS 07-06-2016 07:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Friar Tuck (Post 660457)
Erm, how do I get to the middle ones without removing half of the bike to get to them?

Something very similar to this?

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/7PC-3-8-EX...25.m3641.l6368

Would need to measure with a tape how much space you've got behind the intakes with the carbs and perhaps the airbox off? Then choose the right length of hex key sockets.

HOS 07-06-2016 07:59 AM

Classic example of why I've built up a large collection of tools over the years, working on bikes :)

Friar Tuck 08-06-2016 05:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HOS (Post 660462)
Something very similar to this?

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/7PC-3-8-EX...25.m3641.l6368

Would need to measure with a tape how much space you've got behind the intakes with the carbs and perhaps the airbox off? Then choose the right length of hex key sockets.

I think it's more of a case of how much skin I can afford to lose off the knuckles with the space available....

Friar Tuck 08-06-2016 05:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HOS (Post 660463)
Classic example of why I've built up a large collection of tools over the years, working on bikes :)

Same here, but you can't beat a good wack with an 'ammer!

HOS 08-06-2016 09:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Friar Tuck (Post 660468)
I think it's more of a case of how much skin I can afford to lose off the knuckles with the space available....

If you're like me with large hands, working on bikes is a bloody challenge! ;)
I've got quite inventive over the years with tools to get at out the way fastners.:D

HOS 08-06-2016 09:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Friar Tuck (Post 660469)
Same here, but you can't beat a good wack with an 'ammer!

Yep ! and cussing through clenched teeth with each hammer blow is part of the technique.

HOS 08-06-2016 09:32 AM

I had one of the worst siezed bolts ever on the bike.
It was a bike specific bolt holding the rear caliper torque arm to a bracket which holds the rear caliper.
The bolt is smooth for the depth of the alloy bracket and threaded at one end.
Needless to say it had welded itself in place, prolly never been taken out.. Steel/alloy interface.
But I wanted to paint the torque arm and bracket.
It took me 1 1/2 hours of applying heat from a propane/butane gas lamp, holding the bracket in moleys because it got so hot and welting the bolt with a 4lb lump hammer.
Held it ontop of the bench drill streel base.
I felt more like a blacksmith?
Kin thing came out eventually. ;)

Sir Ewok 08-06-2016 12:45 PM

Wanted to take the rear disc of an old 600 Divi that I had been given, it looked like an old 78rpm record it was so scored. I managed to loosen all the allen cap screws but one and no amount of freeing oil/heat/lumping it with a hammer would free it. I removed all the free bolts and since the disc was scrap anyway I ground the recalcitrant bolt off. Sometimes, once the head is off, you can actually unscrew the remaining stud with your fingers.... not this bastard. I finally welded a nut on the end of the stud and with the aid of much oil and heat finally managed to remove the stud. Steel bolts in ali are a bloody nightmare. :mad::eek::o

Grav 08-06-2016 07:10 PM

I have always put copper slip on all the bots I take out when servicing my bikes over the years. It saves a lot of grunting and swearing, but there's always the one who's sole purpose in life is to piss you off as much as possible before being removed.

Friar Tuck 09-06-2016 04:20 AM

Glad it's not just me that gets these! The ones that I really get mad with are those Phillips headed bolts that the japs favoured using in the 70's! nearly every one I've come across have had the cross heads rounded out, or had them chewed out with hammer and screwdriver where the previous owner has tried to knock the screw out!

Biker Buster 09-06-2016 07:26 AM

Use synthetic grease, if you use copperslip between steel and an aluminium alloy you will promote galvanic corrosion.

Synthetic grease is completely neutral.

HOS 21-06-2016 07:40 AM

The coils are back on and the valves and vacuum lines in place.
8 plug caps on in the right order. I just need to order the heat shield from Cradely Kawasaki becuase I just noticed there should be one over the rocker cover and underneath all the plumbing. Makes sense with the heat build up there in that location.
I've painted the top frame rails in Hammerite gloss black. A very decent finish I must say and considering the frame rails arent visible under the tank.
I've swapped some ordinary stainless allen bolts I fitted for domed head to clear the tank.
Started painting the headstock and just painted again one half of the front of the engine. Using: "Granville cylinder black" and its superb !!! A tiny tin goes a very long way !!!

Trying to get at the other half of the engine to paint that ready to get the Vance and Hines pipes on. Since the major house improvements last year the garage got infected with boxes of household stuff :(

HOS 21-06-2016 07:42 AM

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